skip to Main Content
Call 775-400-1322 For An Initial Consultation info@hrindemand.com

New Nevada Pregnant Workers’ Fairness Act

Are You in Compliance with the New Nevada Pregnant Workers’ Fairness Act?
By: Melissa Marsh, M
A, SPHR, SHRM-SCP

Did you know that Nevada employers have a new legal obligation to pregnant employees? On June 2, 2017, the Nevada Pregnant Workers’ Fairness Act (SB 253) was adopted and it applies to employers with 15 or more employees. Notice requirements under this bill went into effect on June 2, 2017, and the remainder of the Act becomes effective on October 1, 2017.

The Act requires that employers must give certain notices to all employees and additional notices to pregnant employees within a specific timeline of learning about the pregnancy.

According to labor attorney, Molly Malone Rezac with Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C.:

there are three specific times when notice must be provided:

  1. The employer shall post the notice in a conspicuous place at the place of business of the employer that is located in an area accessible to employees.
  2. The employer shall provide the notice to all new employees.
  3. The employer shall provide the notice (again) to an employee, within 10 days after the employee notifies their immediate supervisor that they are pregnant.
Read More

Working with an HR Consultant Can Be Cost Effective

HR Consultants: A Cost-Effective Option for Small Businesses
By: Melissa Marsh, MA, SPHR, SHRM-SCP

What does HR mean to you?

As a small business owner or operator, Human Resources or HR, probably equates with finding employees as quickly as possible and getting them on task right away.

What about after employees are hired?

Then, HR means dealing with small issues that pop up—and, then, turning to the Internet to educate yourself on tricky situations and hoping for the best.

It doesn’t have to be that way.

Is it possible to use an HR consulting company in a cost-effective way?

HRinDemand is constantly searching for and implementing easy-to-use tools for our clients. For instance, small businesses don’t need a large, full-blown Employee Handbook. HRinDemand offers an Employee Rulebook for those employers with less than 10 employees—and it is half the cost of a full employee handbook. This way, small businesses can comply with pertinent regulations and appear professional, knowledgeable and organized from the first day a new employee starts work.

Read More

What’s in Your Personnel Files?

5 Best Practices for Storing Employee Information
By: Caty DeLone, HR Consultant

The personnel file is often overlooked as simply a necessary storage unit for your employees’ information. But did you know that an employee’s personnel file is considered a legal document? Should an employee ever question your company’s actions in a court of law, the personnel file can be your greatest ally or threat, depending upon the information contained within it.

The questions then arise: What information should and should not be kept in an employee’s personnel file? How many files should HR maintain for each employee?

Below are five best practices to keep in mind when managing personnel files:

Practice 1: Privacy

Keep all personnel information in a locked and secure place to ensure the privacy of your employees. Your employees trust HR to keep information—such as their home address, social security number and birthdate—confidential, and it is imperative to maintain that trust.

Read More

The FLSA rule is “blocked”…now what?

Right before the effective date of December 1, 2016, the Department of Labor’s final rule updating overtime regulations, was blocked by a Federal Judge in Texas. The Final Rule makes significant changes to salary threshold requirements; according to the Department of Labor (DOL) website:

“The Final Rule focuses primarily on updating the salary and compensation levels needed for Executive, Administrative and Professional workers to be exempt. Specifically, the Final Rule:

  1. Sets the standard salary level at the 40th percentile of earnings of full-time salaried workers in the lowest-wage Census Region, currently the South ($913 per week; $47,476 annually for a full-year worker);
  2. Sets the total annual compensation requirement for highly compensated employees (HCE) subject to a minimal duties test to the annual equivalent of the 90th percentile of full-time salaried workers nationally ($134,004); and
  3. Establishes a mechanism for automatically updating the salary and compensation levels every three years to maintain the levels at the above percentiles and to ensure that they continue to provide useful and effective tests for exemption.”
Read More

Hiring Tips: Ways to Avoid Hiring Roulette

Hiring TipsWell here we are…right where we knew the economy was headed. Northern Nevada is experiencing exciting and beneficial growth in our region as all the hard work and promises are coming to fruition.

An unfortunate side effect of this growth is a tight employment market—which, in turn, is making it extremely challenging for employers to find good quality candidates. Retaining good employees is another growing challenge. [See Employee Retention a Concern for Nevada Business.]

How businesses—especially existing small businesses—approach hiring is an important aspect of successfully riding the wave of this growth.

Since small businesses often operate in a lean manner, the bandwidth to apply resources to recruitment of new hires is lacking. This can result in rushing and quick decisions, which will come back to bite if an employee is hired without a thorough process.

Use the following hiring tips to ensure

Read More
Back To Top