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CHECK AGAIN: Are You Using the Correct Form I-9?

What You Need to Know About the New Form I-9
By:
Caty DeLone, HR Consultant

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has released a new version of the Form I-9 that must be in use by all U.S. employers by September 18, 2017. It is important to note that this is the second version of the form to be released in less than 12 months. Although the changes to the form are subtle, it is important to familiarize yourself with them and ensure that you are utilizing the proper version of the form by the required date.

What Has Changed?

  • An update to the List of Acceptable Documents was made to now include as part of List C, the Department of State’s Form FS-240 Consular Report of Birth Abroad.
  • Changes have been made to the language within the instructions that describe when the Form I-9 must be completed.
  • The Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices (OSC) has now been changed to the Immigrant and Employee Rights Section (IER) in the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division.
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What’s in Your Personnel Files?

5 Best Practices for Storing Employee Information
By: Caty DeLone, HR Consultant

The personnel file is often overlooked as simply a necessary storage unit for your employees’ information. But did you know that an employee’s personnel file is considered a legal document? Should an employee ever question your company’s actions in a court of law, the personnel file can be your greatest ally or threat, depending upon the information contained within it.

The questions then arise: What information should and should not be kept in an employee’s personnel file? How many files should HR maintain for each employee?

Below are five best practices to keep in mind when managing personnel files:

Practice 1: Privacy

Keep all personnel information in a locked and secure place to ensure the privacy of your employees. Your employees trust HR to keep information—such as their home address, social security number and birthdate—confidential, and it is imperative to maintain that trust.

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Reminder – Post OSHA Summary Report by February 1

Your Company’s OSHA Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses Must be Posted Before February 1

OSHA Summary Form 300A

Does your company have more than 10 employees? (Or, if it’s in the medical/dental industry, does it have more than one employee?) If so, you are obligated under OSHA laws to post a Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses that occurred at your company last year. This Summary must be posted by February 1 and remain on display through April 30.

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5 Simple Tasks to Wrap Up Your HR Year

1. Ensure Your Employee Information is Up-to-Date

Do you have current information for all of your employees? Remind them to submit an updated contact form if they have moved, changed phone numbers, or want to designate a new emergency contact.

Having correct addresses will also aid in IRS Form W-2 Wage and Tax Statement distribution.Reviewing Employee Files

2. Check Your Postings/Required Notices

Look at your company bulletin board. Do you have the latest required notices to be in compliance with Federal and State requirements? If you post electronically, make sure the latest version has been uploaded to your company intranet.

This is a good time to tear down the old and tack up the new.

(HRinDemand offers an all-in-one labor law poster for $50 that satisfies Federal and Nevada posting requirements. Call us at 775-400-1322 to order yours!)

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